Entrepreneurial Kids: The Fun Way to Learn the Fundamentals – Games that Teach Kids Entrepreneurship

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Entrepreneurial skills are useful for more than just starting a business. The fundamental skills it takes to start and grow a business transfers to success in school, success in the workplace and success in life. Now before you break out the latest copy of Entrepreneur magazine and discuss the merits of the latest tech start-up, why not start with something a little more fun?

Fun Family Games that Teach Kids Entrepreneurship

Many of the classic board games that we grew up with contain elements of entrepreneurship. Monopoly, for example, requires that players decide between conserving cash flow and rapid expansion. Even more basic games that require counting and math skills lay the foundation for your budding entrepreneurs.

The four games featured below, however, teach kids about business in a more direct manner. Not only will you and your kids learn skills that will last a lifetime, you will enjoy playing together as a family!

#1: Earn My Keep puts the fun into business for children ages 4-12. As kids get to research and become “real professionals”, they’re exposed to the benefits of a lifelong love of learning and the seamless incorporation of subjects like business, science, art and finance.

Children select one of 50 careers and then choose a fun kid-friendly task from the career’s profile. When the child completes the task within an agreed-upon amount of time, you can choose to reward them with money or something else you choose as a family.

#2: The Cash Flow game is a classic favorite in our home. I love that there are two different versions of the game: one is designed for kids, ages 6 to 12 and the other for ages 12 and up.

The idea with the Cash Flow board games is to get out of the “rat race” of a traditional J-O-B and moved into replacing the income from the J-O-B with passive income from businesses, investments, and real estate.

#3: The Millionaire Maker game is very similar to Cash Flow and is designed for ages 12 and up. We have it as well and play them each equally as often.

#4: Go Venture is ideal for middle school or high-school age children. The cool part about Go Venture is that in any single session players may be required to act out subjects as you would with Charades, solve word puzzles, answer trivia questions, draw, solve definitions, and answer riddles.

Every player participates in every single turn so there is no chance of getting bored. There is also a very collaborative team aspect to Go Venture where everyone is helping each other succeed in business.

There is always fun that can be had when teaching your kids about business and entrepreneurship! As a matter of fact, in writing “The Parents’ Guide to Raising CEO Kids”, we found that kids who took time to have fun in life were able to balance the demands of life more effectively!

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About Author

Sarah Cook, Founder of Raising CEO Kids, is a sought after speaker, business coach, sales trainer, and co-author of “The Parent’s Guide to Raising CEO Kids” (August 2011). She was the host of the CEO Kids Success Summit (2009) and the Cash Savvy Kids Summit (2010). Sarah has been featured in blogs and on radio around the world as well as in Yahoo Finance and Reuters. Sarah has interviewed over 160 young entrepreneurs and most of their parents, uncovering the pillars and pitfalls of being a successful teen CEO. In her soon-to-be released book, Sarah discusses ways that teens can turn their talents and motivation into money. She helps teens and tweens around the world get the support, tools and strategies they need to live their dreams. When not working to grow businesses, Sarah can be found spending time with her husband and three entrepreneur kids, working out, reading, connecting with people on social media, or indulging in extra dark chocolate with chili peppers! You can find Sarah on Twitter @SarahLCook or Facebook.com/RaisingCEOKidsFans

7 Comments

  1. This is very cool since Me & kids are always trying to find #thingy to do… I never thought of it but this is really what we have been looking for thx for this great opportunity.. My son plays Farmville which also taught him to be more of a vegetarian since he feeds cows & chickens he stop wanting to eat meat needed a new game FV is getting kinda cluttered now..

  2. What an intriguing list of games and a great website. A fun and educational resource for grandparents and grandchildren! Do you have the links for 2 and 3 (I’m babysitting grandchildren, so if I missed them elsewhere, I apologize – I’m definitely rushing as I type this 🙂  🙂  🙂 Signing up for your site too 🙂 Thanks again. 

  3. What an intriguing list of games and a great website. A fun and educational resource for grandparents and grandchildren! Do you have the links for 2 and 3 (I’m babysitting grandchildren, so if I missed them elsewhere, I apologize – I’m definitely rushing as I type this 🙂  🙂  🙂 Signing up for your site too 🙂 Thanks again. 

  4. This is a magnificent site and great topic.
    Actually I thought I was very much alone on this but I see that there is a large community around entrepreneurship and CEO kids.  I am familiar with the game CashFlow but not the others.  I myself play and run workshops with a game called FreshBiz.  the game is aimed to develop entrepreneurship thinking.  it is a board game played with 3-4 players and can be played by ages 10-120.  I play the game very often with my 12 and 14 year old boys.  they learn the power of partnership and changing environment and leveraging investments and so on in the game.  The game is just becoming available now in the USA.  I’d be glad to shar more info about this game if anyone is interested.

  5. Pingback: Mom, I want to be a business owner when I grow up. « Don't Forget Your Jacket

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