Raising Entrepreneurial Kids: 9 Quick-Start Businesses for your Budding Entrepreneur

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Got a future entrepreneur in your family? Why not start them early with these simple to start, kid-friendly businesses for your budding entrepreneur!

#1: Cash for Crafts – Crafts are my daughter’s very favorite hobby so naturally that is what she does for her business. Craft businesses are easy for kids to start – get your budding entrepreneur creating something they themselves like: tiled mosaics or garden stones, handmade purses or aprons, scrapbooking, cards and other paper crafts, knitting, beading jewelry, soap making, candle making, felt story boards, painting or even making pencil toppers.

#2: Senior Service Agent – There are so many things kids can do for seniors, including dog walking, pet care, watering plants and flowers, cleaning, and running small errands. Suggest your little entrepreneur connect with the social director at the local retirement homes and assisted living centers to discuss the services that would be helpful to their residents and get their help distributing flyers and sign-up sheets.

#3: Babysitting and Parent Helpers – Parents are always looking for babysitters.  If your entrepreneurial child enjoys being around kids, entertaining them and yes – cleaning up after them, then suggest they consider babysitting. If your child wants to be a top-requested babysitter, suggest taking CPR classes and preparing a babysitter bag of activities.

#4: Computer Tech Support – Is your future entrepreneur a whiz with computers? Help your child turn that tech knowledge into a small business. Potential services include removing computer viruses, setting up modems, networking computers and troubleshooting computer glitches.

#5: The Write Stuff – Did you know that your child can write poetry, a novel or even a how-to booklet and get paid for it?  Many magazines, websites, blogs, publishing companies and authors are looking for articles written by kids.

#6: Web Design Dynasty – Literally every company in the world needs a website and if your kidpreneur knows how to design them, it’s the perfect opportunity to build a mini dynasty. Get your budding entrepreneur started building her own site as a sample and then she’s ready to move on to working with clients.

#7: eBay Extraordinaire – Become a Power Seller! – The online auction site eBay is a goldmine for kids who know how to turn trash into treasure. Get your child started by cleaning out your house and selling your old junk on eBay. When your child gets the hang of what sells and for how much, go to yard sales and pick things up for cheap to resell. My son once bought a broken X-Box for $0.25 at a garage sale and then sold it for $45 on eBay.

#8: Pro-Blogger – Blogs have become the RAGE and they are very inexpensive or FREE to create.  If your future entrepreneur has a topic to write or video about that others are interested in, you can get a lot of traffic on your site and traffic equals revenue in the form of advertising as well as selling services related to the blog.

#9: Yards and yards of GREEN – If your little entrepreneur likes to be outside and doesn’t mind getting dirty, then suggest starting a yard care business. Potential services include raking or blowing leaves, weeding, mowing lawns, planning flowers or vegetables, edging and trimming, watering plants, fertilizing and more!

Don’t forget to add a comment below–we love to hear from you!

Want to raise a CEO Kid? Head on over to RaisingCEOKids.com to grab your copies of “40 FREE and Low Cost Tools to Help you Grow Biz” and “The Power of One” Webinar. For daily updates, LIKE RaisingCEOKids on Facebook!

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About Author

Sarah Cook, Founder of Raising CEO Kids, is a sought after speaker, business coach, sales trainer, and co-author of “The Parent’s Guide to Raising CEO Kids” (August 2011). She was the host of the CEO Kids Success Summit (2009) and the Cash Savvy Kids Summit (2010). Sarah has been featured in blogs and on radio around the world as well as in Yahoo Finance and Reuters. Sarah has interviewed over 160 young entrepreneurs and most of their parents, uncovering the pillars and pitfalls of being a successful teen CEO. In her soon-to-be released book, Sarah discusses ways that teens can turn their talents and motivation into money. She helps teens and tweens around the world get the support, tools and strategies they need to live their dreams. When not working to grow businesses, Sarah can be found spending time with her husband and three entrepreneur kids, working out, reading, connecting with people on social media, or indulging in extra dark chocolate with chili peppers! You can find Sarah on Twitter @SarahLCook or Facebook.com/RaisingCEOKidsFans

9 Comments

  1. Kathryn Schwab on

    Love these ideas! I own a voiceover side business and was thinking about getting my 8yr old to start doing some kid narrating for fun and maybe some cash! He's a good little reader and maybe he can have a fun little “side thing going”… 🙂 Great tips!

  2. These are really great ideas for kids! Even young children can do some of these (ie- #2) senior service agent! And it reinforces good social skills. 🙂 Julie @EtiKidsNYC

  3. Some unusual ideas here too – great starters for parents looking to kick start the entrepreneurial habit and mindset in their children !
    Sue Atkins
    Author of “Raising Happy Children for Dummies”

  4. OnlinePRNews on

    My kids would be really great at helping seniors — especially since our area is a retirement community haven! I never really thought about it, but may just have to look into it. 🙂 — Tara

  5. I have a 10 yr old girl who is UBER creative and brimming with energy. The other day she showed me Tshirt designs she’d sketched – and they were pretty good! I made the mistake of saying “we can set up a little website for you to sell your t-shirts and stuff to make a little extra money…” Within the hour, she was standing at my elbow, saying, “…Well? When are we going to build my website?” (Sheesh! She puts on more pressure than my clients!) < LOL >

  6. I have a 10 yr old girl who is UBER creative and brimming with energy. The other day she showed me Tshirt designs she'd sketched – and they were pretty good! I made the mistake of saying “we can set up a little website for you to sell your t-shirts and stuff to make a little extra money…” Within the hour, she was standing at my elbow, saying, “…Well? When are we going to build my website?” (Sheesh! She puts on more pressure than my clients!) < LOL >

  7. Pingback: 10 Summer Activities that Smart Parents can do with their Middle School StudentsMath coaching and tutoring

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